PLOS Comp Bio’s front page!

The work of our molecular dynamic expert, Bernhard Knapp, has made the front page of the PLOS Computational Biology . The image shows how CDR3 loops scan a peptide/MHC complex (Figure below: Snapshot from the website). Immune cells in the human body screen other cells for possible infections. The binding of T-cell receptors (TCR) and parts of pathogens bound by major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) is one of the activation mechanisms of the immune system. There have been many hypotheses as to when such binding will activate the immune system. In this study we performed the, to our knowledge, largest set of Molecular Dynamics simulations of TCR-MHC complexes. We performed 172 simulations each of 100 ns in length. By performing a large number of simulations we obtain insight about which structural features are frequently present in immune system activating and non-activating TCR-MHC complexes. We show that many previously suggested structural features are unlikely to be causal for the activation of the human immune system.

How CDR3 loops scan a peptide/MHC complex. Rendering is based on the 100 ns simulation of the wild-type TCRpMHC complex. Blue: peptide; Solid white cartoon and transparent surface: first frame of the MHC helices and β-sheet floor; Orange: equally distributed frames of the CDR3s over simulation time. Transparent white cartoon: first frame of all other TCR regions.

How CDR3 loops scan a peptide/MHC complex. Rendering is based on the 100 ns simulation of the wild-type TCRpMHC complex. Blue: peptide; Solid white cartoon and transparent surface: first frame of the MHC helices and β-sheet floor; Orange: equally distributed frames of the CDR3s over simulation time. Transparent white cartoon: first frame of all other TCR regions.

Leave a Reply