Interesting Antibody Papers

Below are two somewhat recent papers that are quite relevant to those doing ab-engineering. The first one takes a look at antibodies as a collection — software which better estimates a diversity of an antibody repertoire. The second one looks at each residue in more detail — it maps the mutational landscape of an entire antibody, showing a possible modulating switch for VL-CL interface.

Estimating the diversity of an antibody repertoire. (Arnaout Lab) paper here. High Throughput Sequencing (or next generation sequencing…) of antibody repertoires allows us to get snapshots of the overall antibody population. Since the antibody population ‘diversity’ is key to their ability to find a binder to virtually any antigen, it is desirable to quantify how ‘diverse’ the sample is as a way to see how broad you need to cast the net. Firstly however, we need to know what we mean by ‘diversity’. One way of looking at it is akin to considering ‘species diversity’, studied extensively in ecology. For example, you estimate the ‘richness’ of species in a sample of 100 rabbits, 10 wolves and 20 sheep. Diversity measures such as Simpson’s index or entropy were used to calculate how biased the diversity is towards one species. Here the sample is quite biased towards rabbits, however if instead we had 10 rabbits, 10 wolves and 10 sheep, the ‘diversity’ would be quite uniform. Back to antibodies: it is desirable to know if a given species of an antibody is more represented than others or if one is very underrepresented. This might indicate healthy vs unhealthy immune system, indicate antibodies carrying out an immune response (when there is more of a type of antibody which is directing the immune response). Problem: in an arbitrary sample of antibody sequences/reads tell me how diverse they are. We should be able to do this by estimating the number of cell clones that gave rise to the antibodies (referred to as clonality). People have been doing this by grouping sequences by CDR3 similarity. For example, sequences with CDR3 identical or more than >95% identity, are treated as the same cell — which is tantamount to being the same ‘species’. However since the number of diverse B cells in a human organism is huge, HTS only provides a sample of these. Therefore some rarer clones might be underrepresented or missing altogether. To address this issue, Arnaout and Kaplinsky developed a methodology called Recon which estimates the antibody sample diversity. It is based on the expectation-maximization algorithm: given a list of species and their numbers, iterate adding parameters until they have a good agreement between the fitted distributions and the given data. They have validated this methodology firstly on the simulated data and then on the DeKosky dataset. The code is available from here subject to their license agreement.

Thorough analysis of the mutational landscape of the entire antibody. [here]. (Germaine Fuh from Affinta/Genentech/Roche). The authors aimed to see how malleable the variable antibody domains are to mutations by introducing all possible modifications at each site in an example antibody. As the subject molecule they have used high-affinity, very stable anti-VEGF antibody G6.31. They argue that this antibody is a good representative of human antibodies (commonly used genes Vh3, Vk1) and that its optimized CDRs might indicate well any beneficial distal mutations. They confirm that the positions most resistant to mutation are the core ones responsible for maintaining the structure of the molecule. Most notably here, they have identified that Kabat L83 position correlates with VL-CL packing. This position is most frequently a phenylalanine and less frequently valine or alanine. This residue is usually spatially close to isoleucine at position LC-106. They have defined two conformations of L83F — in and out:

  1. Out: -50<X1-100 interface.
  2. In: 50<X1<180

Being in either of these positions correlates with the orientation of LC-106 in the elbow region. This in turn affects how big the VL-CL interface is (large elbow angle=small  tight interface; small elbow angle=large interface). The L83 position often undergoes somatic hypermutation, as does the LC-106 with the most common mutation being valine.