Counting Threads

When someone talks about “counting threads” the first thing that you think of is probably shopping for bed sheets. But this post is not about the happy feeling of drifting off to sleep on smooth, comfortable Egyptian cotton. This post is about that much less happy feeling when you want to quickly run a bit of code on a couple of data sets to finish the results section of a thesis chapter, and you see this:

Luis blocking the server again....

Luis blocking the server again….

Obviously someone (*cough*Luis*cough*) is having some fun on the server without nice-ing their code to allow people who are much less organized than they should be (*cough*me*cough*) to do a quick last-minute data analysis run.

The solution: confront the culprit with their excessive server usage (Note: alternatives include manual server restart with a power cord to make the world your enemy – not recommended).

So… now we just need to find out how much of the server “ospina” is using. Screenshots won’t convince him… and we can’t take enough screenshots to show the extent of the server-hogging with his 1000s of processes anyway. We need to count…

Luckily there is a handy function to find out information about processes called pgrep. This is basically a ‘ps | grep’ function which has a bunch of options to reflect the many ways it can be used. We see opsina is running R, so here goes:

pgrep -c R

The -c flag counts processes and the pattern matches the command name that was run. But yeah, it turns out this wasn’t the best idea ever. A lot of people are running R (as might be expected in the Statistics Department), and you get a number that is really too high to be likely. We need to be more specific in our query, so let’s go back to the ps command. Second attempt:

ps -Af | grep ospina | wc -l

What we’re doing now is first showing all processes that are run on the server (ps -A) also showing details of the command run and who ran it (-f flag). Then we’re finding the ones that are labelled with our server culprit (grep ospina) and counting the lines we find. There are annoyingly still a few problems with this approach.

  1. We just ran this command on the server and thus will count a command like grep –color=auto ospina,
  2. User “ospina” is probably running a few more things than just his R command (like ssh-ing into the server and maybe a couple of screens)
  3. We get a number than looks far lower than what we expected just by visual inspection.

So… what happened? We can fix problems 1 and 2 by just piping to a further grep command. But problem 3 is different. As it turns out, our culprit is running multiple threads from the same process (which is also why you find so many chrome instances on htop for example). We just counted processes, when really the server is being occupied by his multi-threading exploits. So… if you want to back up your complaint with a nice number, here’s your baby:

ps -ALf | grep opsina | grep R-3.3 | wc -l

The -L flag displays all threads instead of only the processes. I further used R-3.3 as it turns out he is using a specific version of R, which I can use to specify this command. Otherwise it also helps to use inputs arguments to functions to search against. If your fingers get too tired to press the shift-key that often, ps -ALf is equivalent to ps -eLf.

For now: moan away, folks!

 

Disclaimer: Any scenarios alluded to in the above text are fictitious and do not represent the behaviour of the individuals mentioned. Read: obviously I do not do my analysis last-minute.